Friday, December 8, 2017

Spread Holiday Cheer with Animal Friends


Exercise is extremely important for rabbits, especially young bunnies who are still growing, learning and developing important social skills. While adult rabbits require time every day for playing and exercising – at least 2 hours daily – it’s even more essential for babies, who should have at least 4 hours to sniff, play and explore each day.

And, the young kits at Animal Friends – like Parker and Porter – are no different. These 5-month-old brothers came to us from another shelter and we saw their playful and energetic personalities right away! Giving Parker and Porter plenty of opportunities to put their minds to work has helped them continue to learn and grow. With the help of enrichment toys like the Toss and Learn Carrot Game, they can even make the most of time spent in their kennels.



You can brighten the lives of our resident rabbits (and all of our animal friends) by sending them a little holiday cheer from our Amazon Wish List. For an added bonus, start your shopping at Smile.Amazon.com and designate Animal Friends as your charity and a portion of every purchase you make on Amazon will be donated to benefit our shelter residents. With the holiday season upon us and lots of online shopping to do, you can make a big difference in the lives of some very deserving animals.

Click here to see what our four-legged friends are wishing for this year!




Support Animal Friends By Doing (Almost) Nothing!



This holiday season, you may be looking for a special way to give back. But with no shortage of shopping, wrapping, traveling, cooking, cleaning and more, you may be short on time (and money!).

Thankfully, there is a way to make an impact in the lives of the homeless animals at Animal Friends with something you're probably already doing!

If you're shopping for gifts on Amazon, a portion of your purchase price can be donated to Animal Friends by using Amazon Smile! You'll receive the same items for the same prices, the only difference is how much brighter you'll be making the holiday season for the dogs, cats and rabbits at Animal Friends.

Just follow these quick and easy steps ...

  1. Go to Smile.Amazon.com and log in to your Amazon account.
  2. Search for "Animal Friends Pittsburgh" and select Animal Friends as your charity.
  3. Start shopping! Be sure to start at Smile.Amazon.com each time you shop to continue supporting Animal Friends all year long.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Veterans Returning to the Workforce

By: Robert Fragasso, Animal Friends' Board of Directors
It is uplifting to see the gratitude that Americans exhibit toward the one percent of our population that serves in the all-volunteer military of our country, this rounded statistic according to the Department of Defense. These men and women have chosen to serve our country and will later return to productive civilian life. They are sorely needed as we are experiencing a shortage of qualified workers here in our area and nationally. There are several factors causing this.
  • Unemployment nationally and locally ranges between 4-5%. That is considered full employment.
  • Our educational system educates, but doesn’t typically teach marketable skills at the secondary and even post-secondary levels in many disciplines.
  • Employers are finding it difficult to locate potential employees with the right work attitude and people skills.
Military veterans, by nature of their service, present both job-specific skills and the right attitude toward work, customers and fellow workers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics places unemployment among returning veterans the same as at the national levels, so most veterans come home prepared to enter the workforce. However that masks the challenges that a minority of returning veterans face in acclimating to civilian life.
 
Pew Research estimates that 10,000 Baby Boomers (born 1945 to 1964) will retire each day for the next 19 years. As Baby Boomers retire in increasing numbers, we will face an even tighter job pool from which to hire. This will result in higher pricing for goods and services and maybe even disruptions in the supply chain. Taking full advantage of the skills and life experience of returning veterans is mandated, as well as being the right thing to do for those who served our country.
 
The Department of Defense research studies put the ratio of returning vets with stress related issues at 10-18%. That doesn’t make them unemployable, but they may need adjustment assistance. My reading on the subject indicates that past wars and military campaigns were no different – they just weren’t as closely studied.

That’s where the Pets for Vets program at Animal Friends comes in to help. Emotional support dogs, trained to the unique needs of the veteran experiencing a physical or emotional challenge, are provided free, including complete starter equipment and ongoing consultative support. If a dog isn’t right for the veteran’s lifestyle, a companion cat or domesticated bunny serves very well in its place.
 
The monetary fund that supports Pets for Vets is named in memory of Major Ben E. Follansbee, a Green Beret and Army Ranger who succumbed to the stresses of his multiple combat deployments. Ben is one of the estimated 22 military veterans who take their own life every day. The Pets for Vets program at Animal Friends is meant to mitigate that statistic through the documented lifesaving power of companion animals.
 
You can help further the aims of this endeavor by:
  • Referring a veteran who may benefit to this program, which can be found described here.
  • Make a tax-deductible contribution. Checks should be made payable to Animal Friends and memo noted that it is for the Pets for Vets program. Send to Animal Friends, 562 Camp Horne Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237.
  • Refer a companion animal trainer to the program. The trainer’s compensation is covered by the Major Ben E. Follansbee Memorial Fund.
In this way, we can truly say “Thanks for Your Service” to the men and women who safeguarded our way of life in the war on terror and in past military conflicts.

Friday, November 10, 2017

Cold Weather Tips for Animal Caregivers



To prepare for falling temperatures, Animal Friends urges anyone who owns or cares for outdoor animals – including feral cats – to take the time to ensure they will be safe and warm during the cold months ahead.

While Animal Friends encourages pet owners to make pets part of the family and keep them inside the home, we recognize that in reality many animals live outside. So, we ant to educate those caretakers about how to ensure that outdoor animals have access to proper food and warm, dry shelters.

Blankets, towels and pillows can retain moisture and freeze, which is why straw is the best insulation against the cold and wet weather conditions.

In addition to keeping outdoor animals’ living spaces insulated, there are other best practices pet owners should abide by, including:

• Using a car mat or rug as a flap over a doghouse door to keep the inside free of wind, snow and rain.
• Examining shelters carefully – and often – to ensure that there are no cracks or holes that will prevent the structure from keeping the animal safe.
• Taking extra care to provide adequate amounts of drinkable water and food at all times during freezing temperatures.
• Inspecting your pet's paws, ears and tail frequently for signs of frostbite – a very common occurrence. If you suspect frostbite, your pet will need to see a veterinarian immediately.
• Monitoring your dog's tether to ensure it is not frozen to the ground or tangled. A tangled chain that is too short can cost your pet his or her life in bad weather.

Animal Friends is hosting its annual Straw Drop, during which free bags of straw are offered to anyone who owns or cares for outdoor animals – including feral cats.

Free bags of straw can be picked up at Animal Friends seven days a week.

Together, we can make certain that once the cold winter weather arrives, the animals in our region will have a safe, warm and cozy place to go!

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Meet Rascal!

A 2-year-old Mini Lop rabbit joyfully hops around the Outreach Center of Animal Friends during one of our BunRuns (resident rabbit recess!). He quickly races through a tunnel before finding a cardboard tube that he tosses into the air. He pauses just for second then is off and exploring once more. This silly, little guy is Rascal.

Rascal came to Animal Friends this past spring when his former family noticed he wasn’t the same after they brought a dog home. The family thought Rascal would adjust and return to his spirited self. But they soon realized they couldn’t give him the help he needed and turned to Animal Friends.

Once he was in our care, we were determined to bring back his true personality. From spending one-on-one time and taking him to BunRuns to giving him puzzles and lots of love, our staff and volunteers worked tirelessly with Rascal to get him out of his shell.

After weeks of care and patience, we slowly but surely noticed his progress. Now, Rascal likes to make toys out of everything he can find! And, if you’re willing he’ll let you brush and pet him for as long as you can stand it.

At Animal Friends, we’re committed to rescuing, rehabilitating and rehoming thousands of pets each year. But without your support, this cannot continue. With your support, medical, behavioral and holistic care will be provided to the animals in our care. With your support, thousands of pets will be given another chance at a life. With your support, more animals will find the loving homes they so deserve.

But, there are still other pets – just like Rascal – who still need your help. So please, even making a simple Sarris candy purchase can help to ensure this lifesaving work continues.

To Purchase Candy

Tell your friends, neighbors and co-workers about Animal Friends and ask for their support through the purchase of these sweet treats. Direct them to SarrisCandiesFundraising.com and simply ask them to use the Group ID# 10-0375 and designate Animal Friends as the organization they choose when placing their order. Orders can be placed online through Thursday, Dec. 14.
 

Christmas orders are due by Friday, Nov. 17 at 5 p.m.
Orders ready for pickup starting Friday, Dec. 15 during regular hours
(M-F 11 a.m.-7 p.m. and S-S 10 a.m.-6 p.m.).

Monday, November 6, 2017

Why You Should Adopt a Senior Pet

November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month. And, to spread the word about the benefits of adding an older four-legged member to your family, here are five reasons why you should adopt a senior pet ...


You can teach an old dog new tricks …

The old expression simply isn’t true – not just for dogs, but for cats and rabbits, too! Unlike their youthful counterparts, senior pets can be much more focused on learning the rules of their new home. A puppy, kitten or baby bunny will often be distracted by the new sights, sounds and smells of a new environment. With an older animal companion who has been around the block a time or two, you’ll be the newest and most exciting thing in their world, so you’re sure to be the center of attention!

What you see is what you get …

When it comes to personality, behavior or medical needs, senior pets usually wear it all on their sleeve. Youngers animals are growing so fast, that they’re almost certain to undergo personality changes as they continue to develop. Plus, whether they’ve learned it in a previous home or during their time at a shelter, older pets can come with a head start on some obedience training!


Golden Age Retrievers …

Animal Friends recognizes the special benefits of matching senior pets with senior owners! Many of our older neighbors find the calm and loyal demeanor of a senior pet to be just what they’re looking for in a companion. The animal and human benefit from the bond they develop – and they’re both likely to become more active during some light play time or a leisurely walk around the neighborhood. And, Animal Friends’ unique Golden Age Retrievers adoption program even offers special discounts to senior citizens who are interested in adopting pets older than a certain age.

They’re wise …

Of course they’re adorable, but young pets can be a lot of work. Whether it’s a puppy who hasn’t grasped the finer points of house training, a cat who needs to learn the difference between the couch and the scratching post or a rabbit who stills sees those computer wires as tasty chew toys, you could have some serious training time on your hands. While nobody is perfect, many senior pets have picked up on some of these common household rules over the years. And, less time spent training means more time to get to know each other!


Ready to love …

The sad truth is that senior pets typically spend a much longer time in shelters, waiting to find loving homes. At Animals Friends, these pets receive plenty of love and affection each day from compassionate staff and volunteers, but nothing compares to having a home to call their very own. Just think how much love you could be missing out on by not giving the gift of a home to a sweet senior pet!

Ready to learn more about a senior pet who is eager to find a loving home? Visit ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/Adopt to find out who might be waiting to meet you!

Friday, November 3, 2017

Oats: Home to Home Adoption Program

EDIT: We're happy to report that Oats has found a loving new home!
 
Oats is a 5-year-old Terrier mix who joined his family about 3 years ago. He was originally adopted from a shelter in Texas after being found as a stray. Although he is very shy, Oats has never shown any signs of aggression toward humans or other animals. He's a sweet and gentle dog, but is fearful of new situations and loud noises like fireworks.
 
This lovable boy is housebroken and loves going for long walks outside. He does well around small dogs and cats, but isn't a big fan of larger, energetic dogs. He would probably thrive in a family with another small dog to help him explore his new home. While he is very shy, Oats is great in the car and is very brave at a groomer or vet's office.
 
Since adopting Oats, his family has welcomed two new members who are currently 2 years and 4 months old. Although he hasn't shown any signs of aggression toward them, the loud noises and chaos that come with young children are very scary to him. His family is heartbroken because they've watched his confidence slowly decrease as he's spent more and more time hiding. He has started losing weight, which is likely because of the increased stress he's been experiencing, especially because recent blood work indicated no medical issues that may have caused the weight loss. That's why his family has made the difficult decision that it's time to find a better life for Oats ... even if that means finding a new family for him.
 
While it saddens his current family, they've debated rehoming him for quite some time. But in Oats' best interest, they've finally decided that he deserves a family that is a better fit for his timid personality. Although he's had a difficult time living with a baby and a toddler, Oats has frequently interacted with children elementary school age and older, and he does great! Oats just needs a calm and understanding family that can be patient with him as he overcomes his fear and slowly gains trust.
  

 


Thursday, November 2, 2017

Build a Feral Cat House


Building a feral cat house is a great way to keep community cats safe from the elements during the cold winter months ahead. To get started with your feral cat house, you'll need to gather a few materials first.

Materials needed:
  • Large Styrofoam cooler (or sheets of 1-inch thick hard Styrofoam)
  • Large cardboard box or plastic storage bin
  • Box cutter or utility knife
  • Black plastic sheeting
  • Gorilla tape
  • Straw

To build your feral cat shelter, follow these steps:

Place the Styrofoam cooler in a box that is about the same size and tape it closed or line the box with sheets of Styrofoam cut to fit.


Cut a round doorway about six inches in diameter in one of the long sides of the box, cutting through both the box and Styrofoam. Do not cut the hole in the center – the wind will blow straight in.

Be sure to cut the circle toward the side and high enough so the bottom of the doorway is several inches above the ground.



Cut a piece of the plastic sheeting to completely cover the box.

Wrap the box as tightly as possible and secure all loose ends with Gorilla tape.

Be sure to cover all openings with tape to make the house as waterproof as possible.


Cut the plastic sheeting that is covering the opening as if you're cutting a pie.

Use small pieces of tape to secure the plastic and make a nice smooth opening.



Stuff straw into the bottom of the box.

When placing the shelter, be sure the opening faces the opposite direction of where the wind will be coming from. Keep in mind that the shelter is lightweight and may need to be anchored.

Catnip can be sprinkled inside to attract cats.



Thursday, October 26, 2017

Halloween Pet Safety Tips


Halloween is just around the corner! While you’re putting together your costume, stocking up on candy and transforming your yard into a spooky graveyard, remember that holidays like Halloween can be stressful times for your pets. Animals don’t understand why their best two-legged friends are wearing scary disguises or why the doorbell keeps ringing all night long.

To keep Halloween fun and safe for everyone in the family, consider the following pet safety tips ...


Sniff Test

If you or your children are going to dress up for Halloween, allow your pet to smell the costume before putting it on.


Beat the Sweets

Keep candy – especially chocolate and gum – away from your pets. Certain candies, wrappers and ingredients can be poisonous and even fatal for pets if ingested.


Leave Fido at Home

Don’t bring your dog (or other pets) trick or treating! The costumes, noise, music, bright lights and decorations could be overwhelming for them. Try finding a quiet room where your pets can curl up with their favorite scary movie instead.




Don’t Over-Decorate

Be careful when decorating your home. Festive items like corncobs, cornstalks, cobwebs, glow sticks and small plastic decorations can cause a choking hazard. Also, don’t forget to cover or hide all electrical cords.


Trick or Treat

If you’re expecting trick or treaters, you’ll want to keep your pets clear of the front door. An open door can be very inviting and the constant ringing of the doorbell by the little ghosts and ghouls could scare your pets and cause them to run.


Dress for Success

Costumes for your pets can be fun (and adorable!) but they should fit well enough to allow them to breathe normally. And, be cautious of any loose or hanging parts like fringe, stuffing or buttons that could pose a choking hazard.

Halloween should be a fun time for everyone, including your pets. And, by following these tips, you can make sure that it’s safe too!

Friday, October 6, 2017

An Especially Great Day at Animal Friends!

It’s always a great day at Animal Friends. But, September 20 was especially great as we welcomed 25 cats and one dog into our new Howard Ash Animal Wellness Center for our very first clinic day! These four-legged clients were treated like royalty in our brand-new holding kennels, prep room and surgery suite. Everything went seamlessly and in no time the pets had recovered from their spay or neuter surgeries and were ready to go back home with their waiting families.

The next day, September 21, we opened the doors to our first low-cost Vaccine Clinic in the Animal Wellness Center. Our exam rooms were filled with wagging tails and our lobby was a cacophony of barks and mews. More than a hundred vaccines were given as well as flea treatments, microchips and plenty of advice to anxious owners.


And we are just getting started!

We know that everyone deserves to have access to affordable wellness care for their pets. And, with the new Howard Ash Animal Wellness Center, we can ensure that every pet owner– especially those who are struggling financially – will have a place to turn.

If you haven't seen our new facility, we welcome you to stop by Monday-Friday between 9 a.m.-5 p.m. to check it out! And, of course, your financial support will keep these critical programs operating and available.

For more information, visit ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/AWC.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Home to Home Adoption Program: Nala


Nala is a 3-year-old American Pitbull Terrier. She is up to date on all of her vaccines including Bordatella and is also microchipped.

Nala is a girl who enjoys going on walks or short runs and likes to chase sticks and tennis balls in the yard. She loves being around her family, but does well by herself for about 8 hours during the day. When she is with her favorite people, she is always up for cuddling and happily lays with her head on someone's leg.

Although she is not deaf, Nala is hard of hearing which is causing some anxiety when she is away from home. She does adapt to new environments, it just takes some patience. Since she is hard of hearing, Nala can be spooked fairly easily, so her current family recommends that she not be left unsupervised with small children.

In January 2015, Nala underwent exploratory surgery which caused her to get Pancreatitis. While she has fully recovered, she is now fed on a low-fat diet. She also has a scar on her right front leg from an infiltrated IV, which has caused some lingering pain for her. Nala has one other dog in her home who she has grown up with. While they get along very well, her family feels she would be much more comfortable as the only pet in her new home.

Nala loves her current family, but with more children in their plans, her anxiety has become an issue. They want what is best for her to have a long, healthy and happy life. So, they're searching for a family that will give their sweet girl all the love she deserves. Could it be yours?

If you think your home might be a good fit for Nala, contact Ryan at rwillimet@gmail.com.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Animal Friends Home-to-Home Adoption Program presents: Bella!

Bella is a 4 year old American Stafford Terrier / Boxer / Afghan Hound mix (we’ve had her DNA tested) who weighs around 80 pounds. We adopted her from a shelter when she was 4 to 5 months old.  She has a redish/brown short hair with minimum shedding.  She has been spayed, is up to date on all her shots, and has been micro-chipped.    She has gone through obedience training with two private trainers in our home and is well trained on all basic commands and leash walking.  She has also gone through the “Fearful Fido” Class at Animal Friends.  She is crate trained and house trained and does very well for even long periods of time without any accidents. We have had no chewing problems and she demonstrates no destructive behavior.  She is invisible fence trained as well.  She is a quiet dog that only barks on occasion or when strangers enter the house or when she sees other dogs.  She has a medium energy level and is as happy laying at your feet as she is going for a walk.  When she is active she is very athletic and would probably be good at agility training.  She is a very loyal dog who always enjoys being around her owner. 


 

Unfortunately, we have to find a new home for her because she is very anxious, guarded, and sometimes growls around young children.   We have four children with one being seven years old and have a neighborhood full of young kids.  We have also experienced some guarding issues around food.   Given that we have worked with her for over three years with our vet and two private trainers, with a variety of methods, without any improvement we have no choice but to give her up to a good home without small children. She would be a perfect dog for a single person, couple, or family with teenage kids.   Please help us find an equally wonderful home for this wonderful dog. 








If you can help Bella find a loving home, please contact Frank at 412.736.5886

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Kiefer and Jack Challenge



Dear Friend,

You know, you never can tell when you’ll make a connection with a very special animal (or two!). Somehow, they just seem to work their way into your heart more than the others. And for me, Kiefer and Jack were two of those very special pets.

I’ll never forget the first time I saw them. Once I locked eyes with them from behind their kennel door, it was love at first sight. I decided to foster them … even though I knew it would not be a temporary situation.

So, I brought them home but soon after, I realized there was something not quite right. They were starting to exhibit signs of upper respiratory infection … which quickly became much more severe.



Coming from a hoarding situation, Kiefer and Jack were two of 17 cats who lived in a filthy and disease-infested house. They never received veterinary care ... not even basic vaccinations. It was no wonder that their infections were soon out of control.

I knew I needed to get them back to Animal Friends – and fast. There they would receive the emergency medical treatment they so desperately needed.

It was heart wrenching not being able to see or help them, but I knew they were in the best place possible. They were at Animal Friends.

Over the next few weeks they were nursed back to health. Soon enough, they were ready to come home with me – permanently.

But there are so many more animals, just like Kiefer and Jack, who are struggling and still need your help.

I’m so committed to saving the lives of these desperate pets that right now I will match every gift 50 cents on the dollar, up to $100,000, through Sept. 16. And, I’d like nothing more than to donate the entire $100,000 – knowing my challenge was maximized!

So, please click here to make a gift … because, together, we can save more lives.

Warmest regards,

Stefania Romoff
Vice Chair
Animal Friends Board of Directors
(... and Kiefer and Jack's mom!)

Friday, August 18, 2017

Squiggy's Bucket List



Our dear Squiggy was rescued in 2013 by our Humane Investigations team. Shortly thereafter, she soon found a loving home. But recently, Squiggy’s owner could no longer care for her and she came back to us.

Soon after she returned we found several masses on her head and neck. They were mast cell tumors. Our Medical team didn’t miss a beat and scheduled her surgery to successfully remove the tumors.

But Squiggy’s cancer has returned – leaving her Animal Friends’ family devastated. This time, we’ve chosen not to operate further with the best interest of Squiggy’s well-being. So we are even more determined to find her a loving home where she can happily live out the rest of her days.

As Squiggy continues to impatiently wait for her family to come along, we want to make her time with us a much fun as possible. So, her Animal Friends' family is helping her check a few things off her bucket list ...

Squiggy's Bucket List

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

How a Microchip Can Keep Your Pet Safe this Summer


Warm weather is upon us and people and their pets are spending time outdoors enjoying the summer. With all of this outdoor fun, it’s important for pet owners to keep their furry family members safe, especially in the unfortunate event of a lost pet.

What is microchipping?


A microchip is a tiny device–about the size of a grain of rice–that is implanted beneath your pet’s skin, typically in the shoulder blade. The procedure is simple and virtually painless for the patient. The small chip contains a unique identification number and can be scanned in the event that the pet is found and brought to a veterinarian, clinic or shelter.

Why is this important for my pet?


Approximately one in three pets will get lost in its lifetime. Even pets whose owners have taken extra precautions can become separated from their families, whether curiosity leads them under a fence or a startling noise causes them to dart out an open door or window. Having a microchip significantly increases the likelihood of a pet and owner being reunited.

According to Found Animals Registry, shelters report that microchipped dogs are 2.4 times more likely to be reunited with their families while microchipped cats are reunited 21.4 times more often! When a microchipped pet is found, most veterinarians, shelters, animal control agencies and police departments can read the chip for easy access to the pet owner’s information. If a pet is found and does not have a microchip, locating the owner becomes a much more difficult task, especially if the animal’s collar and identification tags have been removed or have fallen off.

How can I get my pet microchipped?


Animal Friends offers low-cost vaccine and microchipping clinics during the year where pet owners can easily access the services they need while receiving information from educated animal care professionals. Here, a microchip will be implanted by a licensed veterinarian and the pet owner’s contact information will be uploaded to a national registry. Microchips are low risk, with less than .01 percent of animals implanted experiencing any negative reactions as a result.

 

What next?


Once your pet is microchipped, you will be given all of the information about the chip including how to access your personal information and make necessary updates such as your family’s veterinary, emergency contact information and even a current photograph of your pet.

A microchip is not a GPS tracking device; it is a permanent form of identification. It is important to remember that while a microchip significantly increases your pet’s chances of being safely returned, every possible precaution should be taken to keep them safe at home this summer.

To learn more about how Animal Friends can help you keep your pet happy, healthy and safe this summer, and to print a money-saving coupon to use toward your pet’s microchip, visit ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org.

Monday, August 7, 2017

Home to Home Adoption Program: Baby

Baby is a sweet and loving 8-year-old Black Lab/Retriever mix who found her way to her current home a little over a year ago after her owner passed away. She is typically a well-behaved and mild-mannered girl and gets along well with her Siberian Husky housemate. Outside the home, Baby can be selective when interacting with other dogs, typically when she is outside of her own yard on walks or at the dog park.


This beautiful girl loves to be pet and will stay right by your side as a constant companion. She would probably do best as the only pet in a family that is looking for a loyal canine friend. Baby spent most of her life with her former owner and is looking for a loving home where she can settle in and relax with her new family. Sharing a home with a canine sibling, Baby hasn't been getting the one-on-one attention she is used to, so her current family wants to find her the perfect home where she can get all the love she deserves.

If you're interested in meeting Baby, please contact Kim at spookyscully@gmail.com or 412.385.2198.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Adopting Two Cats is Twice as Nice!


Shelters face tough times during the spring and summer … it’s the dreaded kitten season. This is when the weather gets warm and cats give birth. Shelters struggle to accommodate the overwhelming influx of kittens that come through their doors each year. And, Animal Friends  is certainly feeling the effects of kitten season.

We have more than 50 homeless kittens waiting to find loving families. So we need your help! Right now is the perfect time to adopt a sweet kitten … or two! At Animal Friends we know it’s twice as nice to adopt two kittens at once.

Not to mention, when you adopt two animals from Animal Friends, you get twice the amount of love for one adoption donation!

There are many benefits to adding two kittens to your family at once ...
  • They will always have a playmate to chase, wrestle and keep them active, well-exercised and healthy.
  • Many cats are social creatures and will love having a sibling to groom and cuddle with during naptime.
  • Often times, destructive behavior in pets is traced to boredom. Having a companion will keep them out of trouble!
  • You can experience the joy of having a friendly greeting when you return home without feeling guilty about leaving your pet home alone.
  • Two cats means double the love, an extra dose of fun and twice as much snuggling!
  • Most importantly, adopting two cats actually saves four lives – the two you’re adopting and the two that will take their spots on the adoption floor at Animal Friends!
So, come to Animal Friends or visit ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/Cats to meet our adoptable kittens today!

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Unveiling a Center of Hope and Healing

On July 15, an Animal Friends' dream was realized - the grand opening of the Howard Ash Animal Wellness Center. Our hearts swelled with pride as we welcomed hundreds of community members to our campus-wide celebration.
 
“With this progressive facility, Animal Friends will be able to increase its commitment to affordable spay/neuter from 10,000 surgeries each year to 15,000 surgeries,” said Animal Friends President & CEO David Swisher.

“We will reach into underserved communities to provide spay/neuter and wellness services along with education and, when needed, transport to our clinic.”
 
While we celebrated the Grand Opening, our Howard Ash Animal Wellness Center isn’t fully operational … just yet. We still need to make a few construction tweaks before we can begin to transfer our Low-Cost Spay/Neuter and Vaccine Clinics, Humane Investigations and Chow Wagon Pet Food Bank programs into their new home.
 
We hope to fully open the doors of our Howard Ash Animal Wellness Center by early September. But rest assured – we’re still proudly offering these services at our Resource Center until we make the big move!
 
So please, continue to check ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/AWC for updates.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Home to Home Adoption Program: Millie

Millie was adopted by her current family when she was just 4 months old. Now, at 6 years old, this pretty girl is in search of a family that will continue to give her all the love she deserves. Millie needs a home where she will be able to snuggle up on the couch with people who love her. She loves to play fetch with her toys, enjoys going for walks and rides in the car, and is even content to just relax around the house or outside.

This Poodle/Dachshund mix is extremely well-mannered and is friendly toward everyone she meets. She runs to greet guests at the door with her tail wagging and loves to give kisses. She is housebroken and knows how to sit, lay down, roll over, sit up, give paw, speak, dance and fetch (whew!). She is a very smart little lady and is always eager to please.

Millie is in excellent health, is spayed, up-to-date on all of her vaccinations and has a microchip. She gets along well with other small dogs but isn't quite as comfortable with larger dogs. Millie's family wants to find her a home where she will get all the same love and attention that she is used to. All that's left to happen is the right family to meet her and fall in love!

If you can give Millie a loving home, please contact jackieandken@hotmail.com.