Monday, November 6, 2017

Why You Should Adopt a Senior Pet

November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month. And, to spread the word about the benefits of adding an older four-legged member to your family, here are five reasons why you should adopt a senior pet ...


You can teach an old dog new tricks …

The old expression simply isn’t true – not just for dogs, but for cats and rabbits, too! Unlike their youthful counterparts, senior pets can be much more focused on learning the rules of their new home. A puppy, kitten or baby bunny will often be distracted by the new sights, sounds and smells of a new environment. With an older animal companion who has been around the block a time or two, you’ll be the newest and most exciting thing in their world, so you’re sure to be the center of attention!

What you see is what you get …

When it comes to personality, behavior or medical needs, senior pets usually wear it all on their sleeve. Youngers animals are growing so fast, that they’re almost certain to undergo personality changes as they continue to develop. Plus, whether they’ve learned it in a previous home or during their time at a shelter, older pets can come with a head start on some obedience training!


Golden Age Retrievers …

Animal Friends recognizes the special benefits of matching senior pets with senior owners! Many of our older neighbors find the calm and loyal demeanor of a senior pet to be just what they’re looking for in a companion. The animal and human benefit from the bond they develop – and they’re both likely to become more active during some light play time or a leisurely walk around the neighborhood. And, Animal Friends’ unique Golden Age Retrievers adoption program even offers special discounts to senior citizens who are interested in adopting pets older than a certain age.

They’re wise …

Of course they’re adorable, but young pets can be a lot of work. Whether it’s a puppy who hasn’t grasped the finer points of house training, a cat who needs to learn the difference between the couch and the scratching post or a rabbit who stills sees those computer wires as tasty chew toys, you could have some serious training time on your hands. While nobody is perfect, many senior pets have picked up on some of these common household rules over the years. And, less time spent training means more time to get to know each other!


Ready to love …

The sad truth is that senior pets typically spend a much longer time in shelters, waiting to find loving homes. At Animals Friends, these pets receive plenty of love and affection each day from compassionate staff and volunteers, but nothing compares to having a home to call their very own. Just think how much love you could be missing out on by not giving the gift of a home to a sweet senior pet!

Ready to learn more about a senior pet who is eager to find a loving home? Visit ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/Adopt to find out who might be waiting to meet you!

2 comments:

  1. , don’t try to train them together. It’s much easier when you don’t have to divide your attention, and they won’t feel like they have to compete with each other. pet ful 101

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